Stack & Associates, P.C.
Contact Our Office Environmental and Land Use Law
404-692-7504

Bee keepers file suit against the EPA

Apples, cucumbers, almonds and pears are just a small representation of food on the list of edibles humans can harvest as a result of pollination. Warnings of Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and the drastic decrease in the bee population have concerned farmers who grow crops that require pollination. In order to increase the size of the area bee population, farmers have shipped in healthy bees to replace those lost to disease.

Bee keepers too have been busy shoring up protective measures to ensure the health of their colonies. Providing supplementary food sources, ensuring water purity, and quarantining collapsing colonies from those that are stable are just a few of the proactive methods bee keepers have taken in the past. Recently, the insect minders have added another resource to their arsenal: litigation.

Representing bee keepers and other interest groups, the Center for Food Safety filed a lawsuit against the EPA in order to require the agency to change the designation associated with neonicotinoids. This class of chemicals is considered an insecticide. The suit seeks to have the poison reclassified as a pesticide. When it is used as a spray on crops, it is regulated. When it is used to cover soy or cotton seeds prior to their planting, it is not. According to the EPA, the use of the chemical as a coating substance does not require regulation because it is used primarily to protect the seeds planted. As a result, vast quantities of the chemical enter the environment, contaminating the soil, insects and other plants.

Farmers favor seeds dosed with insecticides because the chemicals keep pests at bay. Problems arise when the treated seeds are planted because traces of the chemicals transfer to the dirt as the seed enters the earth. Any wind that accompanies the planting lifts the chemicals, causing them to travel to area farms and hives. We noted a similar phenomenon in a previous blog about the dicamba drift.

In filing the lawsuit, the plaintiffs are endeavoring to protect the current bee population and future pollinators. According to the lead plaintiff, "In order for state regulators to be able to take action there has to be a label and then a violation of the label. If there was a label then it would give our regulators the ability to take corrective action when that actually occurs." Bee keepers fear the lack of a label prevents restrictions on future dosed seeds that can be brought to market.

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information

Contact Our Firm

In the legal profession as in other fields, past accomplishments are often the best indicators of future success. Our representative cases bear witness to our law firm's ability to represent clients against even the most formidable adversaries, including government bodies and giant corporations, in both individual and class action claims.

Email Us For A Response

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy

Our Office Locations

ATLANTA -
260 Peachtree Street N.W.
Suite 1200
Atlanta, GA 30303

Phone: 404-692-7504
Fax: 404.522.0275
Map & Directions

SAVANNAH -
7 E. Congress Street
Suite 404
Savannah, GA 31401

Phone: 404-692-7504
Phone: 912.232.0567
Fax: 404.522.0275